A Promising Start: Year Up's Initial Impacts on Low-Income Young Adults' Careers

by Anne Roder; Mark Elliott

Apr 1, 2011

Year Up, a non-profit organization headquartered in Boston, was founded by a former software entrepreneur in 2000 to provide a year of training and work experience to urban young adults ages 18 to 24. It has been able to develop a network of program sites across the country without the constraints imposed by public funding. Initial results from a small-scale impact study conducted by Mobility demonstrate that Year Up students experience remarkable earnings gains after a year in the labor market, compared to a control group. These gains were achieved during one of the worst economic recessions in recent memory, a recession that hit young people particularly April 2011 A Promising Start Year Up's Initial Impacts on Low-Income Young Adults' Careers Anne Roder Mark Elliott economic mobility corporation 1 A Promising Start Year Up's Initial Impacts on Low-Income Young Adults' Careers hard. Also, the Year Up experience does not deter young people from pursuing further education—program participants are just as likely to enroll in postsecondary education as control group members.

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